IFPDA_Fair_Logo_2021.png

Spring Online Edition, May 14 - 28, 2021

Thank you for visiting! The fair is now closed.

Catherine Burns Fine Art

+1 510-654-7910

Never miss a closing day again:

Thanks for submitting!

IFPDA_Fair_Logo_2021.png

Catherine Burns has been a dealer in fine prints and drawings for over 35 years. She launched her business after serving as the Curator of Collections and Adjunct Professor at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst Museum, and later as Curator of the Washington University Museum of Art, St. Louis. Her inventory of museum-quality prints reflects her strong interest in American and French art, German Expressionism, and British Modernism.

 

Catherine was a founding member of the International Fine Print Dealers Association and exhibits at the New York Print Fair and international art fairs. In past years, her firm published illustrated catalogues and now maintains a website of current inventory focused on 19th and early 20th century American and European works. Catherine is also interested in the purchase or consignment of prints and drawings.

Image:

Benton Spruance, "Traffic Control", 1936

Powered-by-Black-type-white-background.p

During this pandemic year, several outstanding private collections of American and European prints fortuitously arrived in the gallery. One focused on American cityscapes, which inspired us to create an innovative interactive catalogue, the first to pair historic photographs and films with prints: Spirit of the American City: https://catherineburns.com/spirit. In my virtual booth, you will see cityscapes ranging from a cool precisionist aquatint by Earl Horter, to teeming masses of humanity by Benton Spruance, to the lonely solitude of city life by Hopper. Another highlight is a fine selection of prints by the virtuoso California wood engraver, Paul Landacre.

New Project(1).png
New Project(1).png

Catherine Burns

Camille Pissarro

"Paysage sous bois, a l’Hermitage (Pontoise)"

1879

8 5/8 x 10 1/2 inches; 21.9 x 26.7 cm

Softground etching and aquatint with touches of drypoint on thin laid japanese paper.

Provenance: Montclair Art Museum, acquired 1945, deaccessioned

Delteil 16 v/v; Shapiro 161 vi/vi.  Edition of 50, intended but never issued in Le Jour et la Nuit. Signed in pencil. This rare print is arguably the most renowned etching by the artist and his most impressionist. The plein-air landscape with a rich textural and painterly surface was executed in L’Hermitage, where Pissarro lived on and off from 1866-1883.   It was commissioned for a project conceived by Degas, an Impressionist print journal to be titled Le Jour et la Nuit but never brought to fruition. It is an important experimental print that uses soft-ground, layers of aquatint brushed directly onto the plate, and scraping in a highly innovative and inventive way. In a fascinating series of successive proofs, the layers of aquatint duplicate dense brushstrokes to produce a prismatic impression of the landscape.

Benton Spruance

"Traffic Control"

1936

9 x 14 3/8 inches; 22.86 x 36.51 cm

Lithograph on wove paper, full margins.

Edition of 35. Signed, dated, titled, and inscribed “Ed. 35” in pencil.  Fine & Looney 132. An extremely rare print, Traffic Control is considered Spruance’s finest accomplishment in printmaking.  He created several prints on the theme of congestion and the dangers of automobile transit.  Quoting Lloyd Abernathy in Benton Spruance, the artist and the man: ‘Many works were also given over to the dynamics and perils of modern transportation . . . Automobiles were caught in massive traffic jams or, in one unnerving comment on holiday fatalities, crushed human bodies beneath their wheels, ‘I am completing ‘Traffic Control’ for this reason,’ he reported to Zigrosser, ‘that aided by you, I’ve put on stone three subjects not being done by anyone else – football, automobiles and fencing . . .’ Featured in Spirit of the American City.

Christopher Nevinson

"The Great White Way"

1920

19 3/4 x 12 inches; 50.1 x 30.6 cm

Lithograph on laid paper, with wide margins.

Black 71. Edition of 25. Signed in pencil. Christopher Nevinson created a series of drypoints, mezzotints and lithographs of New York in 1919 and 1920, inspired by the city’s vibrant modernity. This extremely rare nocturne is one of the finest, in which he captured the teeming masses and towering skyscrapers with stark black and white contrasts. The 1920 print celebrates the spectacle of the theater district of New York City just before prohibition. The district earned the nickname The Great White Way because it was the first large section of street to shift from gas lamps to electric lighting in the entire country. Not only did this change bring bright lights and fanfare to the Broadway marquees but it helped change social customs, making it acceptable for solitary women to be out after dark in that area.  Selected as Collector’s Choice at the London Original Print Fair by Jonathan Bober, the Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings at the National Gallery of Art, Washington. “Nevinson’s The Great White Way (1920) conveys his wonder at the energies of Manhattan on the eve of its first vibrant era, as well as a satisfaction at the natural coincidence his geometry with the city’s grid and canyons.” Featured in Spirit of the American City.

James Abbott McNeill Whistler

"Weary"

1863

7 7/8 x 5 1/8 inches

Drypoint and roulette on thin wove paper.

Harris Whittemore, Waterbury CT; to his friend John P. Elton (1865-1948) Waterbury, CT; by descent to his heirs.

Kennedy 92 ii/iii; Glasgow iv/vi, before the erasure of the date and further work on the top of the chair.  Signed in pencil with the artist’s butterfly monogram and ”imp”.  Selected as Collector’s Choice at the London Original Print Fair by Catherine Daunt, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Prints and Drawings at the British Museum: “Looking at this image, I can almost hear the sigh as Whistler’s model, Joanna Hiffernan, sinks into her armchair, her hair undone, her limbs heavy. It is a fleeting, intimate moment, captured with urgent drypoint lines. At the bottom left, a ghostly head from a previous composition provides a tantalizing insight into the history of this particular copper plate.”  This romantic study of Joanna Hiffernan, Whistler’s mistress, is one of the artist’s most celebrated prints and is extremely rare, especially signed with the butterfly. Jo Hiffernan was also the model for his famous painting, Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl.  Harris Whittemore purchased both the painting and this lovely impression of Weary. During the early 1860s, Whistler was closely associated with the Pre-Raphaelites, and Weary shows the influence of Rossetti.

Martin Lewis, "Late Traveler", 1949

Paul Landacre

"Growing Corn"

1938

8 3/4 x 4 1/2 inches

Wood engraving on wove japanese paper, full margins.

Wien 209 ii/ii. Rare first edition of 60 (according to Wien, there were 59 signed impressions in the first edition and 7 in the second). Signed, titled, numbered 10/60. “Inspired by the prior season’s resplendent corn crop grown in his backyard and elsewhere on the Hill, Landacre sketched and then engraved Growing Corn, perhaps the most widely exhibited of his prints. Many of Landacre’s American contemporaries during the Great Depression, including Georgia O’Keeffe, John Steuart Curry, and Gustave Baumann, paid homage to the majestic corn stalk as a vital and symbolic source of nourishment for man and beast.” (Wien)  

George Bellows, "A Knockout", 1921

Camille Pissarro

"Paysage sous bois, a l’Hermitage (Pontoise)"

8 5/8 x 10 1/2 inches; 21.9 x 26.7 cm

Softground etching and aquatint with touches of drypoint on thin laid japanese paper.

Delteil 16 v/v; Shapiro 161 vi/vi.  Edition of 50, intended but never issued in Le Jour et la Nuit. Signed in pencil. This rare print is arguably the most renowned etching by the artist and his most impressionist. The plein-air landscape with a rich textural and painterly surface was executed in L’Hermitage, where Pissarro lived on and off from 1866-1883.   It was commissioned for a project conceived by Degas, an Impressionist print journal to be titled Le Jour et la Nuit but never brought to fruition. It is an important experimental print that uses soft-ground, layers of aquatint brushed directly onto the plate, and scraping in a highly innovative and inventive way. In a fascinating series of successive proofs, the layers of aquatint duplicate dense brushstrokes to produce a prismatic impression of the landscape.

Benton Spruance

"Traffic Control"

9 x 14 3/8 inches; 22.86 x 36.51 cm

Lithograph on wove paper, full margins.

Edition of 35. Signed, dated, titled, and inscribed “Ed. 35” in pencil.  Fine & Looney 132. An extremely rare print, Traffic Control is considered Spruance’s finest accomplishment in printmaking.  He created several prints on the theme of congestion and the dangers of automobile transit.  Quoting Lloyd Abernathy in Benton Spruance, the artist and the man: ‘Many works were also given over to the dynamics and perils of modern transportation . . . Automobiles were caught in massive traffic jams or, in one unnerving comment on holiday fatalities, crushed human bodies beneath their wheels, ‘I am completing ‘Traffic Control’ for this reason,’ he reported to Zigrosser, ‘that aided by you, I’ve put on stone three subjects not being done by anyone else – football, automobiles and fencing . . .’ Featured in Spirit of the American City.

Christopher Nevinson

"The Great White Way"

19 3/4 x 12 inches; 50.1 x 30.6 cm

Lithograph on laid paper, with wide margins.

Black 71. Edition of 25. Signed in pencil. Christopher Nevinson created a series of drypoints, mezzotints and lithographs of New York in 1919 and 1920, inspired by the city’s vibrant modernity. This extremely rare nocturne is one of the finest, in which he captured the teeming masses and towering skyscrapers with stark black and white contrasts. The 1920 print celebrates the spectacle of the theater district of New York City just before prohibition. The district earned the nickname The Great White Way because it was the first large section of street to shift from gas lamps to electric lighting in the entire country. Not only did this change bring bright lights and fanfare to the Broadway marquees but it helped change social customs, making it acceptable for solitary women to be out after dark in that area.  Selected as Collector’s Choice at the London Original Print Fair by Jonathan Bober, the Senior Curator of Prints and Drawings at the National Gallery of Art, Washington. “Nevinson’s The Great White Way (1920) conveys his wonder at the energies of Manhattan on the eve of its first vibrant era, as well as a satisfaction at the natural coincidence his geometry with the city’s grid and canyons.” Featured in Spirit of the American City.

James Abbott McNeill Whistler

"Weary"

7 7/8 x 5 1/8 inches

Drypoint and roulette on thin wove paper.

Kennedy 92 ii/iii; Glasgow iv/vi, before the erasure of the date and further work on the top of the chair.  Signed in pencil with the artist’s butterfly monogram and ”imp”.  Selected as Collector’s Choice at the London Original Print Fair by Catherine Daunt, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Prints and Drawings at the British Museum: “Looking at this image, I can almost hear the sigh as Whistler’s model, Joanna Hiffernan, sinks into her armchair, her hair undone, her limbs heavy. It is a fleeting, intimate moment, captured with urgent drypoint lines. At the bottom left, a ghostly head from a previous composition provides a tantalizing insight into the history of this particular copper plate.”  This romantic study of Joanna Hiffernan, Whistler’s mistress, is one of the artist’s most celebrated prints and is extremely rare, especially signed with the butterfly. Jo Hiffernan was also the model for his famous painting, Symphony in White, No. 1: The White Girl.  Harris Whittemore purchased both the painting and this lovely impression of Weary. During the early 1860s, Whistler was closely associated with the Pre-Raphaelites, and Weary shows the influence of Rossetti.