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In business since 2006 Ruiz-Healy Art specializes in contemporary works of art with an emphasis on Latinx and Latin American artists, as well as working with prominent Texas-based artists. With galleries in San Antonio, Texas, and New York City, Ruiz-Healy Art's continuous investments in these underrepresented areas have remained a longstanding signature of the gallery program.

Image:

Ethel Shipton, Cambio/Change, 2021, Signed and editioned, Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper, 36 x 48 in, 91.4 x 121.9 cm, Edition of 10

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Ruiz-Healy Art is delighted to present a solo exhibition of Ethel Shipton. Shipton’s practice is rooted in the observation of everyday situations and consideration of the linguistic narrative that is created through text. Shipton’s conceptual starting point culminates in direct, accessible but enigmatic works, prompting the viewer to voice fundamental questions. Through printmaking, painting, installation, photography and text, Shipton spotlights instants of clarity that flit by in the comings and goings of daily life. In the words of the artist, “Space and time, movement and place I see going hand and hand. These two elements continue to be groundwork for my artwork. We all continue to move between time and space on a moment-by-moment basis.”

In her most recent body of work “Which Way to Go,” a series based on photographs, Shipton presents highway exit signs marked with the names of small towns like Eden, Hope, and Happy. In this context viewers of the artwork can have completely different reflections based on their own experiences and background.

The print “Cambio/Change” reflects the artist’s vision for the future: “I am optimistic that the world can change for the better, I keep thinking that life is never what you can see.”

Past works by Shipton have centered on ideas of urban scenes, language, and attempts to process information. In 2020, during the darkest days of Covid-19, the artist reworked her 2014 "Exit Sign series" in a work titled “Frontera 1845”. Here, the images are reordered to place Cotulla at the center of the seven signs. In 1845 the US-Mexico border was the Nueces River and not the Rio Grande. The first U.S. town after crossing the Nueces River is Cotulla, a significant place for the artist personally and socially as it was also an inspiration for the Lyndon B. Johnson Civil Rights Act of 1964. It was in Cotulla where Johnson spent the year of 1928 teaching grade school students. Johnson’s experience in Cotulla provided him with his "first lessons in the high price we pay for poverty and prejudice," and inspired his later work with civil rights and higher education opportunities for all Americans.

Ruiz-Healy Art | Ethel Shipton

Ethel Shipton

La Frontera 1845

2020

30 x 40 in, 76.2 x 101.6 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000

Ethel Shipton

Cambio/Change

2021

36 x 48 in, 91.4 x 121.9 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000

Ethel Shipton

Which Way to Go: Eden

2021

48 x 36 in, 114.3 x 91.4 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000

Ethel Shipton

Which Way to Go: Hope

2021

48 x 36 in, 121.9 x 91.4 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000

Intallation views of "La Frontera 1845" and "La Gloria"

Ethel Shipton

Which Way to Go: Happy

2021

48 x 36 in, 121.9 x 91.4 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

Prints from the artist's studio

Ethel Shipton

La Frontera 1845

30 x 40 in, 76.2 x 101.6 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000

Ethel Shipton

Cambio/Change

36 x 48 in, 91.4 x 121.9 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000

Ethel Shipton

Which Way to Go: Eden

48 x 36 in, 114.3 x 91.4 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000

Ethel Shipton

Which Way to Go: Hope

48 x 36 in, 121.9 x 91.4 cm

Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper

Edition of 10

$2,000