PRINT MONTH 2021

October 4 - 29

Print Month returns for 2021 with daily online programs at 12 Noon Eastern. The IFPDA is proud to share this platform with our members, our cultural partners, and our community with programs and symposia organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the International Print Center of New York, the Print Council of America, the Association of Print Scholars, and the galleries and publishers of the IFPDA.

To view all Print Month events from 2020, click here: Print Month 2020

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October 4, 2021

Monday

12:00 PM EDT

Paupers Press (London); A Virtual Studio Visit and Conversation

Join us for a virtual studio visit and live demonstration at Paupers Press, London with artist and printer Michael Taylor. Paupers Press is a fine art print and publishing studio in Hoxton, London which works both by commission from artists and galleries as well as publishing under its own name, inviting artists to create projects which can incorporate techniques including stone or photo-offset lithography, hand cut and digital relief woodblocks, hard/soft ground/aquatint etching as well as copperplate photogravure, photo etching, and polymer plates. Some of the artists who have created projects with Paupers Press include Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Paula Rego, Rachel Whiteread, Glenn Brown, Brian Eno, Peter Blake, Christopher Le Brun, Grayson Perry, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Chris Ofili, Jenny Saville, Mat Collishaw, Craigie Aitchison, Martin Creed, and most recently James Turrell.

Michael Taylor, Master Printer

October 7, 2021

Thursday

12:00 PM EDT

Full Spectrum: Celebrating 50 years of the Brandywine Workshop and Archives

The Brandywine Workshop and Archives (BWA) is a non-profit cultural institution that promotes printmaking as a fine art by engaging artists and audiences from diverse, often transnational, backgrounds; offering community-based educational opportunities, and producing and sharing art to build bridges among global communities. Since its founding in 1972 by artist Allan Edmunds, the Brandywine Workshop has become an internationally recognized center for printmaking as well as a vital part of the Philadelphia arts community. In 2022 BWA will celebrate the institution’s 50th anniversary.

Shelley R. Langdale, Curator and Head of Modern Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art, Brandywine Workshop and Archives advisory board member

Tatiana Reinoza, Assistant Professor, Department of Art, Art History & Design, Notre Dame, Brandywine Workshop and Archives advisory board member

Phillip A. Townsend, Curator of Art, Art Galleries at Black Studies (AGBS), The University of Texas at Austin

October 12, 2021

Tuesday

12:00 PM EDT

IFPDA Foundation 2020 Book Award Lecture

Happy Accident: Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Blackburn, & Tatyana Grosman and the Rise of Collaborative Printmaking

IFPDA Foundation Book Award winner, “Prints and Their Makers” pays homage to the distinct (yet sometimes overlapping) roles of the artist, the printer, and the publisher. For this talk, author Phil Sanders focuses on Robert Rauschenberg’s 1963 lithograph, Accident, which was printed by the famed master printer Robert Blackburn, and published by Universal Limited Art Editions founder Tatyana Grosman. The lecture begins with this unlikely trio of collaborators at the moment in printmaking history that forever changed the notion of prints, printmaking, and print publishing. Introduction by Susan Teller, Member, IFPDA Foundation.

Phil Sanders is a collaborative master printer. He was formerly COO of The Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts and Director/Master Printer of its program, Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop. He has taught at Penland School of Craft, Stanford University, and San Francisco State University

October 15, 2021

Friday

12:00 PM EDT

Harlan & Weaver; A Virtual Studio Visit and Conversation with Felix Harlan & Kiki Smith

Join us for a virtual studio visit, live demonstration, and a conversation with Felix Harlan and artist Kiki Smith. Harlan & Weaver (New York) specializes in etching and other forms of intaglio printmaking, working both with commissioned work for publishers such as Peter Blum Edition, Marlborough Graphics, James Cohan Gallery and the Whitney Museum of American Art and publishing in their own name. Harlan & Weaver has published works by Richard Artschwager, Christiane Baumgartner, Louise Bourgeois, Robert Cottingham, Steve DiBenedetto, Carroll Dunham, Nicole Eisenman, James Siena, Kiki Smith, Mark Strand, José Antonio Suárez Londoño, and Stanley Whitney, among many others. Prints made at Harlan & Weaver may be found in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the New York Public Library, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The British Museum, Tate Britain, and other important collections.

Felix Harlan, Master Printer

Kiki Smith, Artist

October 20, 2021

Wednesday

12:00 PM EDT

El Nopal Press: Cross Border Discourses Through Print

Organized in association with IFPDA, this symposia presented by the Association of Print Scholars explores El Nopal Press (Los Angeles), founded by Francesco Siqueiros in 1990, and distinguished by its focus on the work of artists who explore border issues, especially conceptual manifestations of the border, and the complex cultural relationships and exchanges that exist between Mexico and the United States. Featuring a virtual studio tour, as well as prepared slides of notable prints, editions, and artists with whom he has collaborated, Siqueiros will discuss his career, which includes his early work at Cirrus Editions, and the myriad of experiences and influences that led him to his present work at El Nopal.

Erin Sullivan Maynes, Assistant Curator, Rifkind Center for German Expressionist Studies, Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Francesco Siqueiros, Founder, El Nopal Press

October 25, 2021

Monday

12:00 PM EDT

The Art of To-day: Grosvenor School Linocuts and their Legacy --- A Symposium on the Occasion of “Modern Times: British Prints 1913-1939” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

In 1926, the artist, writer, and teacher Claude Flight wrote "The Art of To-day," in which he described what he saw as the role and responsibilities for contemporary artists, particularly in relation to what he termed "the collective spirit of the times." That same year, Flight began teaching the color linocut technique at London's Grosvenor School of Modern Art, a method he believed most accurately reflected the principles for a more modern, democratic art that he promoted in his writings. In this series of talks, speakers will discuss color linocuts made by artists affiliated with the Grosvenor School (known as the Grosvenor School artists) and their creation, exhibition, reception, and marketing over a series of decades. Moderated by Jennifer Farrell, Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Prints and Illustrated Books at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Contemporary and Historical Perspectives on the Market for Grosvenor School Artists; A Discussion with Mary Ryan, Les Garfield, and Gordon Samuel.


Gordon Samuel is a founding partner of Osborne Samuel, specialising in rare British 20th century prints and the linocuts of the Grosvenor School. Recent pioneering print exhibitions have included the complete prints of CRW Nevinson, Cyril Power and Sybil Andrews and in 2019 Gordon Samuel curated the biggest ever museum exhibition of British Modernist prints at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London.

Mary Ryan Gallery began with a focus on modern prints and introduced some of the first exhibitions of British Linocuts, Provincetown Woodcuts, and Atelier 17 in the United States. The gallery is the exclusive representative of several modern masters and estates including Sybil Andrews, Hugo Gellert, Louis Lozowick, Ethel Mars and Lill Tschudi, promoting their work and generating collector awareness and major museum exhibitions.

Les Garfield, Collector and IFPDA Foundation Board Member

Moderated by Jennifer Farrell, Curator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

October 28, 2021

Thursday

12:00 PM EDT

Themes and Variations: Topics from Print Council of America --- Art and the Pull of Print; A Conversation

How might we more fully consider the physical operations of printmaking as contributing to the conceptual, metaphorical, and visceral implications of prints as works of art? Jennifer Roberts will provide an overview of her recent A.W. Mellon lectures Contact: Art and the Pull of Print (see link to recordings below) and then will discuss, with Raftery and Adamson, the ideas set forth in the lectures. What would it mean to consider contact rather than reproduction as the essence of print? To argue that printmaking drives, rather than derives from, innovation in other media? To imagine that the processes of printmaking, its nuanced way of facing up to the factual, encourage a way of seeing the world that is urgently needed today? Attendees are encouraged to watch Roberts’ lectures in advance, but this will not be necessary to engage in the program.

Link to recorded lectures:
https://www.nga.gov/research/casva/meetings/mellon-lectures-in-the-fine-arts/roberts-2021.html

Jennifer L. Roberts is the Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities at Harvard University. She is a scholar of American and British art from the 18th century to the present day. Her work approaches the history of art through its intersections with print history, material studies, the theory and practice of making, and the history and philosophy of science.

Moderated by Shelley R. Langdale, Curator and Head of Modern Prints and Drawings, National Gallery of Art.

Glenn Adamson is a curator and writer who works at the intersection of craft, design history and
contemporary art. He has previously been Director of the Museum of Arts and Design; Head of
Research at the V & A; and Curator at the Chipstone Foundation in Milwaukee. His most recent book is Craft: An American History, published by Bloomsbury in 2021.

Andrew Raftery is an artist specializing in both fictional and autobiographical narrative scenes of
contemporary American life. Known for his paintings, burin engravings and drawings, Raftery has developed a particular interest in prints for their ubiquitous role in our world: on wallpaper, clothing, and functional objects. His artistic practice is heavily research-based as a curator and collector, and it is both personal and objective, a constant self-reflection informed by historical research on the democratization of mediums.

October 5, 2021

Tuesday

12:00 PM EDT

A Conversation on the Impact of Prints in Museum Collections: What Do Museum Directors Say? --- with Michael Govan, Glenn Lowry, Sasha Suda, and Sir Norman Rosenthal

Join Michael Govan, CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Glenn Lowry, David Rockefeller Director at the Museum of Modern Art (New York); Sir Norman Rosenthal, the retired Exhibitions Secretary at the Royal Academy (London); and Sasha Suda, Director and CEO of the National Gallery of Canada for a conversation about the impact of prints on their respective museums, on their careers, and on them personally. Moderated by David Tunick, President, IFPDA.

Michael Govan, CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Glenn Lowry, David Rockefeller Director at the Museum of Modern Art (New York)

Sir Norman Rosenthal, the retired Exhibitions Secretary at the Royal Academy (London)

Sasha Suda, Director and CEO of the National Gallery of Canada

David Tunick, President, IFPDA

October 8, 2021

Friday

12:00 PM EDT

Gemini G.E.L Celebrates The Met’s 150th Anniversary --- A Virtual Studio Visit and Conversation

Join us for a virtual studio visit and conversation with the makers and publishers of the portfolio celebrating The Met’s 150th Anniversary. Participants include Sidney Felsen, co-founder of Gemini G.E.L., and Jill Lerner, master printer at Gemini; portfolio co-publisher Sharon Hurowitz; Max Hollein, The Metropolitan Museum’s Marina Kellen French Director; and Jennifer Farrell, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Prints at The Met. Also part of the conversation will be with Ranjani Shettar, one of the artists in their portfolio, “The Met 150,” commissioned for the Museum’s 150th anniversary. The portfolio follows in the tradition of the print Robert Rauschenberg created with ULAE for the Museum’s 100th anniversary. For the new project, the Museum reflects on its position as a global art institution with a diverse group of international artists: Siah Armajani, Vija Celmins, Jasper Johns, Kerry James Marshall, Julie Mehretu, Wangechi Mutu, Gabriel Orozco, Ed Ruscha, Ranjani Shettar, Richard Serra, Sarah Sze, and Xu Bing. Founded in 1966, Gemini G.E.L were pioneers in multi-process printmaking and their archive was acquired by the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, where they were the subject of three major exhibitions, most recently “The Serial Impulse at Gemini G.E.L.” (2016).

Sidney Felsen, co-founder of Gemini G.E.L.

Jill Lerner, master printer at Gemini

Ranjani Shettar, artist

Sharon Hurowitz, portfolio co-publisher

Max Hollein, The Metropolitan Museum’s Marina Kellen French Director

Jennifer Farrell, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Prints at The Met

October 13, 2021

Wednesday

12:00 PM EDT

Looking Back on the New York Graphic Workshop, 1964-1970

Organized in association with IFPDA, this symposia presented by the Association of Print Scholars explores the past, present, and future of printmaking studio practices, specifically examining how the medium has evolved conceptually, culturally, and as a dialogic artistic practice.

This panel will consider the work and legacy of the New York Graphic Workshop, a printmaking collective operative from 1964 to 1970. Together, printmakers Luis Camnitzer (b.1937), José Guillermo Castillo (1938-1999), and Liliana Porter (b. 1941) devoted themselves to producing conceptual pieces indebted to printmaking and its labor-intensive processes. Even as they were committed to traditional methods, the NYGW often bent lithography, etching, and engraving away from their conventions, toward new questions, problems, and ideas. As Camnitzer stated in 1966: “We are printmakers conditioned but not destroyed by our techniques.”

Nora Rosengarten, Ph.d. candidate, Harvard University

Luis Camnitzer, Artist-Printmaker

Ursula Davila-Villa, Independent curator and art historian

Liliana Porter, Artist-Printmaker

October 18, 2021

Monday

12:00 PM EDT

The Art of To-day: Grosvenor School Linocuts and their Legacy --- A Symposium on the Occasion of “Modern Times: British Prints 1913-1939” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

In 1926, the artist, writer, and teacher Claude Flight wrote "The Art of To-day," in which he described what he saw as the role and responsibilities for contemporary artists, particularly in relation to what he termed "the collective spirit of the times." That same year, Flight began teaching the color linocut technique at London's Grosvenor School of Modern Art, a method he believed most accurately reflected the principles for a more modern, democratic art that he promoted in his writings. In this series of talks, speakers will discuss color linocuts made by artists affiliated with the Grosvenor School (known as the Grosvenor School artists) and their creation, exhibition, reception, and marketing over a series of decades. Moderated by Jennifer Farrell, Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Prints and Illustrated Books at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

We’re In the Army Now – Military Subjects in the Linocuts of Lill Tschudi


Marcel Just, independent scholar, co-curator of the forthcoming exhibition, “The Excitement of Modern Life; Lill Tschudi and the Futuristic Linocut” at the Graphische at Sammlung ETH Zürich (2022)

October 21, 2021

Thursday

12:00 PM EDT

Themes and Variations: Topics from Print Council of America --- Poetic Science: The Origins of Digital Printmaking

Leslie Jones and Debora Wood will present the origins of computer-generated prints and the creative applications of new technologies from the 1950s through the 1980s. Some of the earliest output devices, including plotters and impact printers, will be discussed as well as works that originated in the computer, but were printed via traditional processes such as intaglios, woodcuts, and screenprints. Vera Molnar, Frederick Hammersley, Waldemar Cordeiro, Otto Beckmann, Frieder Nake, Joan Truckenbrod, Jean-Pierre Hébert, are some of the artists whose work will be explored. This program aims to create a greater awareness of early computer-generated art while providing context for understanding contemporary digital prints.

Leslie Jones, Curator of Prints and Drawings, Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Debora Wood, Independent Curator and Scholar


October 26, 2021

Tuesday

12:00 PM EDT

Printmaking in the Expanded Field with Susan Tallman

In her famous, problematic 1979 essay “Sculpture in the Expanded Field,“ Rosalind Krauss claimed that postmodern art could no longer be categorized by materials (bronze and stone for sculpture, for instance), and instead was now organized “through the universe of terms that are felt to be in opposition within a cultural situation.” The binary terms she chose to form the fence posts of sculpture’s “expanded field” were architecture and landscape. “ The postmodern space of painting,” she argued, “would … turn on the opposition uniqueness/reproducibility".

The fact that she frames the relationship between uniqueness and reproducibility as a binary opposition and as a problem reveals a critical blind spot. And yet she is largely right. For the past 50 years the critical discussion about uniqueness and reproducibility in art has itself played out in part, because of its unparalleled economic heft. Prints have been largely ignored as objects of critical inquiry for obvious reasons: there is nothing transgressive about the powerless taking on attributes of the powerful (think of women wearing trousers versus men wearing dresses). This talk looks at a range of printed art that may or may not be identified by its maker as “prints”. These works raise intriguing questions about what it is we actually want from art and why. They may also supply unexpected answers.

Susan Tallman is a writer, critic and art historian. She has written extensively on contemporary art, the history of prints, and other aspects of art and culture. A regular contributor to New York Review of Books among other publications, she has authored and co-authored many books, most recently No Plan At All: How the Danish Printshop of Niels Borch Jensen Redefined Artists Prints for the Contemporary World. In 2011 she co-founded the journal Art in Print, and served as its Editor-in-Chief until its closure in 2019.

October 29, 2021

Friday

12:00 PM EDT

Breaking Ground, Part 2: Pattern and Print with Joyce Kozloff and Judith Solodkin, SOLO Impression

Organized by International Print Center New York (IPCNY), this two-part series engages artists from IPCNY’s exhibition Present Tense: New Prints, 2000-2005 and explores their defiant embrace of forms traditionally regarded as craft, ornament, and the feminine.

Judy Solodkin, SOLO Impression

Joyce Kozloff, Artist

Moderated by Judy Hecker, Director, IPCNY

October 6, 2021

Wednesday

12:00 PM EDT

Prints in Relief; Print Study Day Presented by The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Print Study Day is organized annually by the Department of Drawings and Prints at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, in association with the IFPDA. The speakers will represent a range of perspectives and approaches on the theme of relief prints – woodcuts and linocuts - to offer insights into old master woodcuts as well as the media’s use by modern and contemporary artists. Moderated by Nadine Orenstein, Drue Heinz Curator in Charge, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A Census of Italian Renaissance Woodcuts

Silvia Urbini, independent scholar and co-curator of the Census of Italian Renaissance Woodcuts, Giorgio Cini Foundation, Venice

“To Put Art to the Service of People”: Elizabeth Catlett and Prints for Black Liberation

Melanie Herzog, Professor Emerita of Art History at Edgewood College, and Senior Lecturer in Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Linocuts: Making and Meaning

Linocuts, also called linoleum or lino prints are a unique 20 th century medium that developed a
particular visual language due to both the materials used in the printing process and the artistic
climate in which they flourished. This talk will look at the techniques artists use to make linocuts
and how the inks, papers, and printing methods contribute to the appearance of the final print.
Contextualizing the prints, including printmaking artifacts, within the aesthetics of a place or
period further adds to the understanding of linocuts as works of art.

Rachel Mustalish, Conservator, Sherman Fairchild Center for Works on Paper and Photograph Conservation, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art


October 11, 2021

Monday

12:00 PM EDT

The Art of To-day: Grosvenor School Linocuts and their Legacy --- A Symposium on the Occasion of “Modern Times: British Prints 1913-1939” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

In 1926, the artist, writer, and teacher Claude Flight wrote "The Art of To-day," in which he described what he saw as the role and responsibilities for contemporary artists, particularly in relation to what he termed "the collective spirit of the times." That same year, Flight began teaching the color linocut technique at London's Grosvenor School of Modern Art, a method he believed most accurately reflected the principles for a more modern, democratic art that he promoted in his writings. In this series of talks, speakers will discuss color linocuts made by artists affiliated with the Grosvenor School (known as the Grosvenor School artists) and their creation, exhibition, reception, and marketing over a series of decades. Moderated by Jennifer Farrell, Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Prints and Illustrated Books at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Perceptive print-making: Grosvenor School linocuts and the middlebrow market


Claude Flight proposed that the linocut could revolutionise print ownership. This talk explores Flight's beliefs, and how effective the work of the Grosvenor School artists actually became in generating an aspirational middlebrow market for the 'art of to-day'.

Hana Leaper is the John Moores Painting Prize Senior Lecturer and Development Manager at Liverpool John Moores University. Hana contributed to the Vanessa Bell exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery (2017) and the Virginia Woolf exhibition at Tate St Ives (2018). In 2019, she curated a large-scale retrospective 'Sybil Andrews: Art and Life' at the Glenbow, Calgary.

October 14, 2021

Thursday

12:00 PM EDT

Themes and Variations: Topics from Print Council of America --- Gilbert Stuart, the Print Trade, and the Genesis of Art as Intellectual Property in the United States

Why were paintings not protected by American copyright law until 1870 while “historical prints,”
(1802), “any print or engraving,” (1831) and photographs and their negatives (1865) benefited from copyright protection? At a time when many a printmaker’s accomplishment was measured in relation to the design of printed images that copied or translated another work of art, nineteenth-century American copyright statutes seemingly presented a conundrum: protecting the copy while leaving the original open to reproduction, appropriation, plagiarism, or any other form of pirating. Starting with Gilbert Stuart’s legal and public battle to control copying, and the circulation of his portraits of George Washington, this lecture explores the roots of an early nineteenth-century understanding of art as intangible property.

Marie-Stéphanie Delamaire, Associate Curator of Fine Arts, Winterthur Museum, Garden and Library

October 19, 2021

Tuesday

12:00 PM EDT

Highpoint Editions (Minneapolis); A Virtual Studio Visit and Conversation

Join us for a virtual studio visit, live demonstration, and conversation at Highpoint Center for Printmaking (Minneapolis). HP Editions publishes fine art prints with invited professional artists in collaboration with staff and Master Printer Cole Rogers while the Highpoint Center serves as an invaluable non-profit training ground for printers and printmakers of all ages and backgrounds. In addition to the studio and workshop, we will explore the current exhibition in the HP gallery, “A Contemporary Black Matriarchal Lineage in Printmaking”, curated by Tanekeya Word and Highpoint Editions artist Delita Martin, the first national exhibition curated by Black women printmakers highlighting the experimental prints of Black women printmakers. The conversation will also examine some highlights of the current major exhibition at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, “The Contemporary Print: 20 Years at Highpoint Editions” with artists Carlos Amorales, Julie Buffalohead, Willie Cole, Sarah Crowner, Jim Hodges, Delita Martin, Julie Mehretu, Todd Norsten, Chloe Piene, David Rathman, Do Ho Suh, and Dyani White Hawk.

Cole Rogers, Master Printer

October 22, 2021

Friday

12:00 PM EDT

Breaking Ground, Part I: Pattern and Print with Polly Apfelbaum and Jean-Paul Russell, Durham Press

Organized by International Print Center New York (IPCNY), this two-part series engages artists from IPCNY’s exhibition Present Tense: New Prints, 2000-2005 and explores their defiant embrace of forms traditionally regarded as craft, ornament, and the feminine.

Moderated by Starr Figura, Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints, MoMA

October 27, 2021

Wednesday

12:00 PM EDT

Sybil and Cyril: Cutting Through Time with Jenny Uglow

Join us for a conversation with author Jenny Uglow as she sheds new light on the dynamic artistic partnership of Cyril Power and Sybil Andrews. In 1922, Cyril Power, a 54 year old architect, left his family to work with the 24 year old Sybil Andrews. They would be together for 20 years. Both became famous for their dynamic, modernist linocuts, streamlined, full of movement and colour, summing up the hectic interwar years. Yet at the same time they looked back, to medieval myths and early music, to country ways disappearing from sight. Cyril & Sybil traces their struggles and triumphs, following them from Suffolk to London, from the New Forest to Vancouver Island. This is a world of Futurists, Surrealists and pioneering abstraction, but also of the buzz of the new, of machines and speed, shops and sport and dance, shining against the threat of depression and looming shadows of war.

Jenny Uglow is a critic and award-winning biographer. She is particularly interested in the relation of word and image, and her books include studies of writers, artists and engravers, including William Hogarth, Thomas Bewick and Walter Crane. Her most recent book, Edward Lear: A Life of Art and Nonsense won the Hawthornden Prize for 2018

Introduction by Jennifer Farrell, Curator, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Moderated by Gordon Samuel, Founding Partner of Osborne Samuel